Posts Tagged ‘Beach’

“Sunset surfer 7″ by David Cresine

July 16, 2009

“Sunset surfer 7″
© Copyright David Cresine

I was in the mood for a nice sunset photo today, so I picked David Cresine’s “Sunset surfer 7“, shown above. Gorgeous colors and I really like the texture of the water on the sand and its reflection of the sunset colors. The surfer is well positioned using the Rule of Thirds.

David Cresine’s photo “Sunset surfer 7” is one of the photos chosen for the Photobird Photo of the Hour. You can see more of David Cresine’s beautiful photos by visiting his Photobird photo album at photobird.com/davidroy.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. You capture and share so many great photos on Photobird.com that we created the Photo of the Hour feature to give you the opportunity to share your very best with the rest of the world. You can see the Photo of the Hour on the Photobird.com home page and on the Look at Pictures page.

It’s really easy to submit your favorite photos to be featured on the Photobird Photo of the Hour: Simply view the photo from your photo album and click the “Submit for Photo of the Hour” checkbox. There is no limit to the number of photos you can submit and we always like to get new submissions.

In return for each photo we use on the Photo of the Hour or People Places and Things, you get more storage space for your photo album so you can store more photos. Details are here.

If you’d like to keep some of your photos private while you share your favorite photos with the world, you can read how easy it is to do that with Photobird photo albums in our Photobird Daily article entitled “Show Off Your Photos, and Keep Some Private“.

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Visit Photobird.com, the easy way to share your photos.

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Help, I Wet My Camera!

May 13, 2009

Photo © Copyright Trustedreviews.com

Whether you’re photographing in the rain, in the snow, at the beach, in the kitchen, or in the bathroom, your camera may get wet. Cliff Smith at Trustedreviews.com has a great article that explains how to keep your camera safe and functional in wet weather.

The third and final page of the article seemed most helpful where Cliff Smith discusses what to do in the event that your camera accidentally gets wet.

First, Cliff Smith advises, don’t panic. If any electronic gadget, including a digital camera, does get wet, it doesn’t automatically mean it’s broken. In fact, you might be able to save the camera if you act sensibly and fast. Cliff Smith advises the following course of action:

  1. Do not turn on the camera until it’s completely dry again.
  2. Remove the batteries immediately, without turning off the camera so the lens doesn’t retract.
  3. Carefully dry any water from the outside of the camera with an absorbent towel.
  4. Do not use a paper towel or tissue on the glass part of the lens since that could scratch it.
  5. Carefully clean any water from the lens and other glass parts with a proper lens cloth or soft lint-free cloth.
  6. Place the camera somewhere warm and dry for at least 24 hours (but don’t overheat it).
  7. You can speed up the drying process by placing the camera in a small box with some moisture absorbing silica gel packs or a handful of rice grains.
  8. Once the camera is completely dry, put in a dry battery and try turning it off and then on again.
  9. If the camera doesn’t start up normally right away, turn it off immediately and seek further advice from your camera dealer or the camera’s manufacturer.

The same tips apply to the memory card inside the camera. According to Cliff Smith, memory cards are so rugged, they can survive a trip in the washing machine; though, we’re hesitant to try this at home. Because of the cards’ durability, you should almost always be able to retrieve your photos, even if the camera ends up requiring further repair.

If your camera is beyond repair, some camera manufacturers offer special discounts if you trade in your damaged camera. The Canon Loyalty Program is one such program which we’ve written about in the Photobird Daily.

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“Laguna Beach, Ca. 1″ by David Cresine

May 7, 2009

“Laguna Beach, Ca. 1″
© Copyright David Cresine

I think I may need to head down to Laguna Beach sometime soon and check out some of these gorgeous sunsets in person. Is it just me, or does Laguna Beach have extraordinary sunsets? Or maybe it’s David Cresine’s fine photographic work. David Cresine seems to be a mostly point-and-shoot type of photographer, like me, and if there’s any post-processing work in his photos, it seems to be quite minimal.

David Cresine has a photo album here on Photobird.com called “Sunrise, Sunset” in which he shows off nearly three dozen of his beautiful sunset photos. He’s submitted several of them for the Photobird Photo of the Hour, and the one shown above entitled “Laguna Beach, Ca. 1” is one of my favorites, and I’ll tell you why.

  1. First, I love the range of colors in this photo. Sunset photos are typically red and orange, but this one has a stunning, iridescent range of deep blues, light blues, reds, yellows, and oranges. It’s a very colorful image. Almost like a rainbow.
  2. Secondly, the silhouette of the palm trees and the observation deck works very well I think, to provide a sense of depth to the image, giving you the impression that you’re actually in Laguna Beach right now. Everything in the photo is also clear and sharp.
  3. Last, but not least, the composition is great. As I’ve written before, I believe that composition is key to great photos. In David Cresine’s photo above, I like how the palm branches in the lower left are seemingly anchored to the lower-left corner of the frame, and how the tall palm trees are located on the right dividing line of the Rule of Thirds. Most important to me about this composition, and especially because it’s a sunset photo, I like that you can actually see the sun in the photo, just resting on the horizon. In many sunset photos, the viewer needs to imagine where the sun is located based on the color patterns in the sky. In David Cresine’s photo, you can see the source of the color, which I like.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. You capture and share so many great photos on Photobird.com that we created the Photo of the Hour feature to give you the opportunity to share your very best with the rest of the world.

It’s really easy to submit your favorite photos to be featured on the Photobird Photo of the Hour: Simply view the photo from your photo album and click the “Submit for Photo of the Hour” checkbox. There is no limit to the number of photos you can submit and we always like to get new submissions.

In return for each photo we use on the Photo of the Hour or People Places and Things, you get more storage space for your photo album so you can store more photos. Details are here.

If you’d like to keep some of your photos private while you share your favorite photos with the world, you can read how easy it is to do that with Photobird photo albums in our Photobird Daily article entitled “Show Off Your Photos, and Keep Some Private“.

You may also discuss your favorite Photobird Photos of the Hour in the Photobird forums.

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“Limantour Beach 5″, by Ed Krimen

April 16, 2009

“Limantour Beach 5″
© Copyright Ed Krimen

I like this beach sunset photo shown above that I took at Limantour Beach in Point Reyes National Seashore in Northern California for a digital camera review of the 5-megapixel Canon PowerShot SD450 tiny digital camera. The sunset is not a vibrant, dramatic sunset like David Cresine’s “Sunset Surfer 7“, nor is it as colorful as “A Winter Sunset” by Vicki Tinnon. And it’s not out of this world like “sunset at 38000 feet” by Mack Robison.

I like that my “Limantour Beach 5” photo evokes a rather serene mood, with subdued colors and the lone person with the baby simply watching the sun descend into the horizon and the glorious color that it creates. Without the person standing there, I think the photo would have little to no impact. I did the same thing between shutter snaps when I was there: Simply watched the sunset. Sunsets can be definitely mesmerizing.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. You capture and share so many great photos on Photobird.com that we created the Photo of the Hour feature to give you the opportunity to share your very best with the rest of the world.

It’s really easy to submit your favorite photos to be featured on the Photobird Photo of the Hour: Simply view the photo from your photo album and click the “Submit for Photo of the Hour” checkbox. There is no limit to the number of photos you can submit and we always like to get new submissions.

In return for each photo we use on the Photo of the Hour or People Places and Things, you get more storage space for your photo album so you can store more photos. Details are here.

If you’d like to keep some of your photos private while you share your favorite photos with the world, you can read how easy it is to do that with Photobird photo albums in our Photobird Daily article entitled “Show Off Your Photos, and Keep Some Private“.

You may also discuss your favorite Photobird Photos of the Hour in the Photobird forums.

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Make Your Photos Tell a Story

April 15, 2009

“After The Storm”
© Copyright Michael Reichmann

One of the goals of photography — perhaps the ultimate goal — is to make each photo tell a story. Even without a story, you naturally want your photos to evoke some emotion from the people who are viewing them. Sure, pictures can simply be pretty and elicit oohs and aahs from your audience. But besides the fanciful colors and objects in your photos, what if you could take your photography a step further and tell a story in each single photo frame?

Michael Reichmann’s photo “After The Storm” shown above tells a story perfectly. It’s not only a great photo with great composition, colors, and exposure, but it also tells a cute story in a single photo. The story makes the photo so much better and even more valuable than if the photo didn’t have a short story. Even if you didn’t know what was going on at the bottom of the photo, the photo is still spectacular. But the story adds so much more. Click the photo above to see a larger version.

At the bottom of the page on Michael Reichmann’s The Luminous Landscape website where this photo resides, a note recommends, “Because images such as this one with highly detailed small sections become almost meaningless on the web, click on the above for a 100% crop of part of the bottom section.” The photo that you get after your click there is shown below, but click the photo below to visit his website to see the slightly larger version.

Photos with stories should stand on their own. The title can help a little, but the title shouldn’t have a huge description that tells the entire story. In Michael Reichmann’s photo shown above entitled “After The Storm“, the title answers our question “Before or after?” and eliminates any suspense and anxiety the audience may have, leading to a peaceful, happy ending. Fortunately, in this story, the beachgoers can take their time in the water and enjoy it without worrying about the storm.


“After The Storm – Detail”
© Copyright Michael Reichmann

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San Clemente Surfer, by David Cresine

April 9, 2009

“San Clemente, Ca. 41″
© Copyright David Cresine

Surfs up!! Dudes and dudettes, I cannot believe I’ve never even mentioned this totally awesome shot by David Cresine called “San Clemente, Ca. 41” here in the Photobird Daily.  This photo is — well — it’s pretty sick!! The composition is down, the timing is right on, the focus is sharp, the exposure is tight, and the surfer’s dominating that wave. Like I said, it’s pretty sick!! (That means good.)

That said, I’m putting on my wetsuit and I’m off to the beach — to build sand castles. Oh, and take some photos. Maybe I’ll learn to surf one of these days. Totally. I’m serious!

David Cresine’s photo “San Clemente, Ca. 41” is one of the photos chosen for the Photobird Photo of the Hour. You can see more of David Cresine’s awesome photos by visiting his Photobird photo album at photobird.com/davidroy.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. You capture and share so many great photos on Photobird.com that we created the Photo of the Hour feature to give you the opportunity to share your very best with the rest of the world.

It’s really easy to submit your favorite photos to be featured on the Photobird Photo of the Hour: Simply view the photo from your photo album and click the “Submit for Photo of the Hour” checkbox. There is no limit to the number of photos you can submit and we always like to get new submissions.

In return for each photo we use on the Photo of the Hour or People Places and Things, you get more storage space for your photo album so you can store more photos. Details are here.

If you’d like to keep some of your photos private while you share your favorite photos with the world, you can read how easy it is to do that with Photobird photo albums in our Photobird Daily article entitled “Show Off Your Photos, and Keep Some Private“.

You may also discuss your favorite Photobird Photos of the Hour in the Photobird forums.

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Photobird’s Simple Guide to Great Photos

January 21, 2009

“Salt Creek, Orange County, Ca. 3″
© Copyright David Cresine

Introducing Photobird’s Simple Guide to Great Photos. You can find this quick guide in the side column on the Photobird Daily front page.

It’s simple really:

1. Composition Is Key.

I wrote the following in the Photobird Daily article “Composition Is Key“:

“Composition is the key element for great photos. If everything else with your photo is not correct — such as bad color, poor lighting, image noise, and imperfect subjects — but your photo is well composed, you can usually fix the other things and still come out with a good photo. If the composition isn’t perfect right out of the camera, you can often crop the photo to get the desired composition, but you must start off with a reasonably well-composed photo.”

In the article, you’ll find links to nearly two dozen helpful articles that have appeared in the Photobird Daily that can help you learn more about composition, or refresh your skills if you’re a professional.

2. Read Understanding Exposure, by Bryan Peterson.

Understanding Exposure gets a lot of attention here in the Photobird Daily because it’s a great photography book; it’s helpful for beginners as well as experienced photographers. I wrote about the book at this link here. And the book is available as one of the prizes in the Photobird Photo Contest. Of course, Understanding Exposure is also available at Amazon.com. (Click then purchase anything at Amazon.com to help us publish the Photobird Daily and the Photobird Learning Center — at no additional cost to you. Thank you!)

3. Share your photos on Photobird.com.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. Here are just a few reasons why you should share your photos on Photobird.com:

But don’t take my word for it. Take our Quick Tour and see what people are saying!

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“Sunset surfer 7″ by David Cresine

January 8, 2009

“Sunset surfer 7″
© Copyright David Cresine

I was in the mood for a nice sunset photo today, so I picked David Cresine’s “Sunset surfer 7“, shown above. Gorgeous colors and I really like the texture of the water on the sand and its reflection of the sunset colors. The surfer is well positioned using the Rule of Thirds.

David Cresine’s photo “Sunset surfer 7” is one of the photos chosen for the Photobird Photo of the Hour. You can see more of David Cresine’s beautiful photos by visiting his Photobird photo album at photobird.com/davidroy.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. You capture and share so many great photos on Photobird.com that we created the Photo of the Hour feature to give you the opportunity to share your very best with the rest of the world.

It’s really easy to submit your favorite photos to be featured on the Photobird Photo of the Hour: Simply view the photo from your photo album and click the “Submit for Photo of the Hour” checkbox. There is no limit to the number of photos you can submit and we always like to get new submissions.

In return for each photo we use on the Photo of the Hour or People Places and Things, you get more storage space for your photo album so you can store more photos. Details are here.

If you’d like to keep some of your photos private while you share your favorite photos with the world, you can read how easy it is to do that with Photobird photo albums in our Photobird Daily article entitled “Show Off Your Photos, and Keep Some Private“.

You may also discuss your favorite Photobird Photos of the Hour in the Photobird forums.

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Photobird Photo Contest for November

November 3, 2008

“Shoreline at Fort Funston”
© Copyright Ed Krimen

“Down” is the theme for the Photobird Photo Contest for November. The rollercoaster that is the stock market is down, but I say what goes down also goes up! And while no one knows how long the stock market will be down, I can say for certain that our Photobird Photo Contest for November will only be open for entries until Sunday, November 30, so get your photo entry in soon! The contest is always free to enter. Enter your photo here.

I shot the photo shown above, entitled “Shoreline at Fort Funston“, looking down from a cliff at the beach, the beachgoers, and the dogs below at Fort Funston in San Francisco. You can see more of my Fort Funston photos in my Photobird photo album.

Photobird Photo Contest details:

The two winners for the Photobird Photo Contest for November will each receive the following cool prizes:

Read more details about the monthly contest here.

Every monthly Photobird Photo Contest has two winners. At the end of each month, we pick one winner for the Photobird Award, and we will tally your votes to determine the one winner for the People’s Choice Award.

See the previous contests and their contest entries at this link.

Go here to enter the contest. And be sure to have your family and friends vote for their favorite entries to help select the People’s Choice Award. (You can send them a quick little reminder here.)

If you have any questions, please ask in the comments below or in the Photobird forums.

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Photobird’s Simple Guide to Great Photos

October 29, 2008

“Salt Creek, Orange County, Ca. 3″
© Copyright David Cresine

Introducing Photobird’s Simple Guide to Great Photos. You can find this quick guide in the side column on the Photobird Daily front page.

It’s simple really:

1. Composition Is Key.

I wrote the following in the Photobird Daily article “Composition Is Key“:

“Composition is the key element for great photos. If everything else with your photo is not correct — such as bad color, poor lighting, image noise, and imperfect subjects — but your photo is well composed, you can usually fix the other things and still come out with a good photo. If the composition isn’t perfect right out of the camera, you can often crop the photo to get the desired composition, but you must start off with a reasonably well-composed photo.”

In the article, you’ll find links to nearly two dozen helpful articles that have appeared in the Photobird Daily that can help you learn more about composition, or refresh your skills if you’re a professional.

2. Read Understanding Exposure, by Bryan Peterson.

Understanding Exposure gets a lot of attention here in the Photobird Daily because it’s a great photography book; it’s helpful for beginners as well as experienced photographers. I wrote about the book at this link here. And the book is available as one of the prizes in the Photobird Photo Contest. Of course, Understanding Exposure is also available at Amazon.com. (Click then purchase anything at Amazon.com to help us publish the Photobird Daily and the Photobird Learning Center — at no additional cost to you. Thank you!)

3. Share your photos on Photobird.com.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. Here are just a few reasons why you should share your photos on Photobird.com:

But don’t take my word for it. Take our Quick Tour and see what people are saying!

~•~


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