Posts Tagged ‘Winter’

“A Winter Sunset”, by Vicki Tinnon

April 2, 2009

“A Winter Sunset”
© Copyright Vicki Tinnon

Winter ended and spring started a couple of weeks ago, but I like this beautiful photo shown above entitled “A Winter Sunset” by Vicki Tinnon. I like the vibrant color of the sunset and how the silhouette of the leafless tree provides an interesting, abstract, and organic shape for us to look at and enjoy.

Vicki Tinnon added this photo to her Nebraska Life photo album and submitted the photo for the Photobird Photo of the Hour. Vicki Tinnon won the Photobird Award for the Photobird Photo Contest for May 2008 with her photo “Moving In“. You can see more of Vicki Tinnon’s inspiring photos in her Photobird photo album at photobird.com/vickitinnon.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. You capture and share so many great photos on Photobird.com that we created the Photo of the Hour feature to give you the opportunity to share your very best with the rest of the world.

It’s really easy to submit your favorite photos to be featured on the Photobird Photo of the Hour: Simply view the photo from your photo album and click the “Submit for Photo of the Hour” checkbox. There is no limit to the number of photos you can submit and we always like to get new submissions.

In return for each photo we use on the Photo of the Hour or People Places and Things, you get more storage space for your photo album so you can store more photos. Details are here.

If you’d like to keep some of your photos private while you share your favorite photos with the world, you can read how easy it is to do that with Photobird photo albums in our Photobird Daily article entitled “Show Off Your Photos, and Keep Some Private“.

You may also discuss your favorite Photobird Photos of the Hour in the Photobird forums.

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Winter Photography

January 14, 2009

“Winter Warmth”
© Copyright Vicki Tinnon

Winter provides unique opportunities for creative photography. Not only do you need to be creative in how you keep yourself and your camera warm, but the colorful tones that the sun casts on the urban and rural landscapes enable you to shoot stunning photos that you can’t get any other time of the year. In an article at the Digital Photography School, Andre Gunther shares his tips for shooting during winter and I’ve listed those tips below.

(If you’re looking for tips on how to prepare yourself and your camera gear for the winter cold, more articles from the Photobird Daily are listed at the bottom of this article.)

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Night & Low-Light Photography, by Jill Waterman

October 7, 2008

The onset of Autumn means that there’s progressively more darkness as we approach Winter. And that means there’s more time to practice our night and low-light photography skills. We’ve written before about low-light photography in the following articles in the Photobird Daily:

A new book entitled Night & Low-Light Photography by Jill Waterman was recently published. Like most photography books, the photos in the book are very inspirational and stunning. Jill Waterman actually takes a unique approach to the book: She draws on the expertise of 30 professional photographers to share their tips, techniques, and creative approaches. The book contains a lot of references to film, but you can safely ignore those since you’re probably shooting with a digital camera.

There’s tips on shooting the moon, photographing stars, shooting in cities and urban settings, photographing the aurora borealis and aurora australis, and even painting with light. The photos in the book are big and beautiful, but some of the text in the book is tiny and difficult to read. You may need a magnifying glass and a flashlight.

Night & Low-Light Photography is highly rated on Amazon.com, with four reviewers giving it 5 stars and two reviewers giving it 4 stars, as of today. The two reviewers giving the book 4 stars seem to be the most legitimate, giving criticisms similar to mine. One of the reviewers giving 5 stars was a photographer featured in the book! Fortunately, someone pointed it out.

If you’re interested in night and low-light photography, I strongly recommend this book. While you may not need the details about film that are discussed in the book, and some of the text may be a little difficult to read, the tips, techniques, and approaches are very helpful, and the photos in the book are magnificent. At less than $20 at Amazon.com, the book is a bargain.

Night & Low-Light Photography is published by my favorite book publisher, Amphoto Books, which also publishes Understanding Exposure, by Bryan Peterson. Understanding Exposure is listed as a prize each month for the Photobird Photo Contest, but the winners actually get to choose a book. Winners may choose one of the books listed on the page at http://amphotobooks.com ; click the book covers and if “Amphoto” is listed under the ISBN number at the top, then the book is available as a prize. The following books are also available as prizes:

Enter the Photobird Photo Contest for your chance to win Night & Low-Light Photography!

Before you buy Night & Low-Light Photography or anything else on Amazon.com, please click one of our Amazon.com links anywhere on Photobird.com. For each product you buy after your click, we receive a small referral fee, at no additional cost to you. Your clicks and purchases allow us to continue to publish the Photobird Daily and the Photobird Learning Center. Thank you for your support!

Also consider Amazon Prime when you buy anything at Amazon.com. Amazon Prime members enjoy the following benefits:

1. Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping on millions of Amazon.com Items
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“Autumn Flower” by Rafa Torcida

September 25, 2008

“Autumn Flower”
© Copyright Rafa Torcida

Rafa Torcida’s stunning photo “Autumn Flower“, shown above, reminded me that Autumn started this past Monday, September 22 at 3:44pm, with the Autumnal equinox in the Northern Hemisphere. No, I didn’t have the date and time memorized. I actually had to look it up, and it was more difficult to find than I expected. I finally got the info from Wikipedia’s “Equinox” page, which is very informative.

I started thinking about the seasons though, and like me, I think most people are focused on when Spring and Summer start than when Autumn and Winter start. People are focused on Spring and Summer because, by that time, they’ll have had enough of the cold weather, they know the weather will become warmer, and it will be time for vacations — so they keep a close eye on the calendar.

A quick web search tells me that it’s the same feeling in the Southern Hemisphere where the seasons are the opposite; people in Australia and New Zealand are just starting to look forward to their Spring and Summer now, with Spring starting up this week. Sounds enticing. And sounds like time for them to start taking photos of beautiful spring flowers. Hey, flowers are always blooming somewhere on this planet, regardless of the seasons.

Photobird.com is the easy way to share your photos. You capture and share so many great photos on Photobird.com that we created the Photo of the Hour feature to give you the opportunity to share your very best with the rest of the world.

It’s really easy to submit your favorite photos to be featured on the Photobird Photo of the Hour: Simply view the photo from your photo album and click the “Submit for Photo of the Hour” checkbox. There is no limit to the number of photos you can submit and we always like to get new submissions.

In return for each photo we use on the Photo of the Hour or People Places and Things, you get more storage space for your photo album so you can store more photos. Details are here.

If you’d like to keep some of your photos private while you share your favorite photos with the world, you can read how easy it is to do that with Photobird photo albums in our Photobird Daily article entitled “Show Off Your Photos, and Keep Some Private“.

You may also discuss your favorite Photobird Photos of the Hour in the Photobird forums.

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Using Your Camera in Cold Temperatures

February 21, 2008

“Snow 6”
© Copyright David Cresine

Ray Davis is no stranger to cold climes. He used to live in Alaska and decided to winter in Chicago this year, where temperatures frequently fell well below zero.

In spite of the cold — or perhaps because of it — he’s put together some great tips in this article on photodoto.com about how to use your camera outside in cold temps while minimizing the risk of damage.

Ray advises snow photographers to:

  1. Invest in a UV filter. This can protect your lens and, if it shatters because of the extreme temperatures, it will only cost 10 bucks to replace.
  2. Buy a decent camera bag and keep it warm. Put some padding around the camera and then invest in some hand or foot warmers, which can be purchased from a sporting goods store for very little money. But wrap them up first so they don’t accidentally leak on the camera equipment.
  3. Buy a giant zip lock bag. Ray says it’s the damage from cold to warm that can damage your camera, particularly as condensation occurs when the cold air meets hot air. If you put your camera in a zip lock bag and seal the top when bringing it in from the cold outdoors, it will reach room temperature more slowly and is less likely to be damaged by condensation.

If you do find condensation on the camera, don’t turn on the camera. Take the battery and memory card out and let the camera dry completely before use. Check out our post from last week about what to do when your camera gets wet for more tips on drying a wet camera. Also, we recommend this related post, about what kind of gear to bring when taking photos outdoors in low temperatures.

Be sure to read Ray’s complete article for additional tips.

What’s the coldest temperature you’ve ever shot in? Let us know in the comments.

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Taking Photos in Low Temperatures

January 31, 2008

“Snow 1”
© Copyright David Cresine

You can just about feel the crisp chill in the air after the fresh snowfall in David Cresine’s photo “Snow 1” above, taken along Big Bear Lake in California.

Whether you’re intending to take photos while skiing, snowboarding, or enjoying a long winter hike, it’s important to be prepared with the right equipment. The folks at fotohacker.com have compiled an excellent list of considerations which might not only result in the perfect shot, but will also certainly keep you warm and safe in the process:

  1. Clothing. Dress in layers. Make sure you have good boots, gloves, and a warm hat. You especially want to keep your head, feet, and hands warm to protect against frostbite and hypothermia.
  2. Food and Water. Bring carbs (trail mix, chocolate, fruit) and water to keep yourself hydrated.
  3. Gear. Be mindful of the environmental rating of your camera equipment. Protect your camera and extra batteries from the elements by keeping them inside your jacket when not in use. Put the camera in a plastic bag to prevent condensation on the camera lens.

We’d probably also add a cell phone and a GPS to this list, just in case.

Any other gear you’d consider essential for a winter shoot?

Be sure to read the article for details to make sure you’ve planned and prepared before heading out to the great outdoors.

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